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Parking Signs

Handicap Parking - State Signs

State Handicap Parking Signs for Every State

Did you know that depending on the state where you live, the law requires different State handicap parking signs to be properly posted and displayed for handicap drivers? To date, more than twenty states require their own specifically designated State disabled parking sign to be displayed. Business owners failing to post the proper sign could run into problems for their lack of compliance.

In addition to posting the correct State handicapped parking signs, some states have different sign requirements for van parking as well. Some states require the posting of the fine or fee to be paid by violators while others such as California require the posting of an explanatory placard. Another State handicap parking sign requires posting the notification that “parking with disabled parking permit only.”

Make Sure You Have the Right State Disabled Parking Sign

Other states have laws and codes that regulate the State handicap parking signs design, size, color and phrasing. Some states such as New York accept out-of-state accepted handicapped parking permits though this is not the norm. The state of California, though not surprisingly, has some strict requirements for its State ADA parking sign. Handicap sign requirements for the Golden State were updated in 2008 and are available from StopSignsAndMore.com.

Each State ADA Parking Sign Has Universally Recognized Symbol

Those states that do not have a specific State handicap parking sign use the federally mandated handicap parking sign, known as the (R7-8) sign. Even though many states choose to have their own State handicapped parking sign, they are each easily recognizable as such and only differ on the specific design and wording of the signs. The general, familiar message remains the same, which is that disabled drivers and motorists are afforded certain rights, including the right to park in designated areas that accommodate their wheelchairs and need to use other assistive devices.

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